Five LinkedIn Resources You Didn’t Know Existed

Jeremy (left) and Omar during their LinkedIn days.

As many of my readers know, I am a devoted LinkedIn user and a former LinkedIn ambassador. Last year I shared my positive review of LinkedIn Publisher as one of the company’s most exciting developments. Recently my friends Jeremy Schifeling and Omar Garriott, who have worked on LinkedIn’s Education team, offered to share insight into some of LinkedIn’s newer features. I think you’ll find the guest column below as helpful as I did.

Over to you, Jeremy and Omar…

Everyone knows that LinkedIn is the place you go to network and find a job. But did you know that LinkedIn can also alert you whether you’re getting paid what you’re worth in your current job — or even help you build the skills to get your next one?

Read on for five surprising new LinkedIn resources that can boost your career:

LinkedIn Resource #1: Shine a Bat Signal for Recruiters

While it’s common knowledge that recruiters use LinkedIn to search for talent, what you may not know is that it’s a pretty frustrating experience for them. After all, many of the candidates they contact may have zero interest in changing jobs, resulting in lots of dead ends and wasted time.

That’s why LinkedIn introduced Career Interests last year. By taking advantage of this feature, you can now tell recruiters that you’re open to new opportunities — even if you’re not actively looking. This creates a win-win: Recruiters can filter out candidates who aren’t interested, and you have a better chance of getting found.

LinkedIn Resource #2: See What You’re Worth

Once you’ve been spotted, and a recruiter has reached out to you, often the first question they ask is the dreaded, “What are your compensation expectations?”

Instead of freaking out and trying to guess at a number that’s not too high or too low, just mention the “going rate.” It’s now easy to find on LinkedIn, which has helpfully compiled information for thousands of job titles around the world its new Salary feature. Just plug in, say, “management consultant” and “New York” and you’ll see that $108,000 is the average pay for that role and region.

LinkedIn Resource #3: Get Pro Help to Get the Job

Good news: Your salary expectations are in line with the recruiter’s, and now she wants to
bring you in for an interview. How do you make sure you do your best — even if you haven’t interviewed in years?

With LinkedIn’s new ProFinder tool, you can get estimates from top career coaches in your area
to help you fine tune your skills. And you can specify exactly what you’re looking for, such as, “interview practice with coaches who specialize in recent grads,” to make sure you get the best possible fit.

LinkedIn Resource #4: Connect with Your New Colleagues

Congratulations — you got the job! Now you just need to figure out who does what and how
to get in touch with them.

While company directories are notoriously unhelpful, LinkedIn’s Lookup app gives you X-ray vision into your organization. You can see who’s on which team and what their specialties are (like, “Oh, that’s who can help me get my HR paperwork set-up!”), along with contact information for email, phone or chat.

LinkedIn Resource #5: Take Your Skills to the Next Level

Now fast-forward a few years. After a great run, you’re itching to try something new — either at your current organization or somewhere else. The only problem is you don’t have the skills to make that jump.

Enter LinkedIn’s Learning section, based on its acquisition of online training service Lynda.com
back in 2015. With the click of a button, you can access online courses on everything from accounting to ZBrush (a 3D sculpting tool) — all ready to watch immediately.

As you can see, LinkedIn has come a long way from merely serving as your online Rolodex. With a host of new LinkedIn resources, the site’s goal is now to boost your career well beyond the “Connect” button.

Jeremy Schifeling and Omar Garriott worked on LinkedIn’s Education team, helping millions of students around the world learn to use the site. They recently launched Land a Great Job with LinkedIn, the only LinkedIn course built by former employees. We invite Lindsey’s readers to get 50% off through September by using this link.

If you want more LinkedIn advice, follow these LinkedIn Experts on Twitter.

2 Responses to “Five LinkedIn Resources You Didn’t Know Existed”

  1. Celeste

    Hi Lindsey

    This article was VERY informative. I noticed the “learning” icon on LinkedIn recently and wondered what it was about but never clicked on it. Until I read your article yesterday. I immediately rushed to my LinkedIn profile and discovered a whole new (exciting) world. I was hooked on a course called “The Neuroscience of learning” which is right up my alley.

    Thank you for pointing this out and for educating us on the power of LinkedIn. I’m seeing it in a whole new light now. A resourceful place I certainly want to spend more time in!

    Celeste

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Celeste – I’m so glad you found this post valuable and that is great that you are already taking advantage of more LinkedIn offerings! – Lindsey

      Reply

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