What Is a Millennial? Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask

What Is a Millennial? Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to AskOn Halloween, you get permission to be something that you’re not, surprising the world with a big reveal.

I’ve found something similar in my work with millennials: Many people have specific, often negative stereotypes about this generation. They’re surprised when they find someone behind the “millennial mask” with traits they weren’t expecting: hardworking, humble, inquisitive, to name a few.

When I talk to people about my work, I hear a lot of preconceived notions about what millennials are like. Most of the time they’re not entirely true. Today I want to provide a peek behind that millennial mask. Although it’s tough to “define” a group of 80 million people, here are some general descriptors I feel comfortable sharing:

First, Don’t Call Them Millennials

Wait, what? Let me explain.

A recent study from Pew Research found that only 40 percent of millennials even identify with the word “millennial,” while nearly 80 percent of those aged 51 to 69 consider themselves part of the Baby Boom generation. I was actually surprised that almost half of millennials are comfortable with their generational moniker. Most young people I meet prefer that their generation not have a title at all.

I think members of Gen Y don’t identify with the term “millennial” because of the negative generalizations that are frequently applied to the millennial generation in the media, like “entitled” or “lazy.” I also find this generation to be more focused on describing themselves as individuals (hence the rise in “personal branding” as a career skill) than as a member of a massive group.

So, what should we call them? Clearly I do use the term millennial (because it’s helpful to call this cohort something), but most millennials don’t care for any group name at all. This is challenging, of course, if you want to talk about people in this age range, but it’s important for marketers and recruiters to understand. (For example, it’s probably not a good idea to market your product or company using the phrase “millennial-friendly.”)

So, what IS a millennial (if we can use that word)?

Let’s move on to some actual data points about this cohort.

P.S. Don’t worry if this is all news to you – you didn’t miss “generations day” in high school. The word millennial is relatively new, and some of the specifics are nebulous, which can promote confusion.

  1. How old are they?

Demographers disagree, but the general number I use – and the one that Pew uses – is those who are between the ages of 18 to 34 in 2015.

  1. How did millennials get their name?

Credit for the moniker “millennial” goes to Neil Howe and and the late William Strauss, who first used the term in the mid-90s and wrote Millennials Rising in 2000. It was outgrowth of work they had done for a book called Generations, which was among the first to explore the idea that groups share qualities such as beliefs, attitudes, values and behaviors because of the time period when they grew up.

Other names applied to this generation include:

  • Generation Y: Yes, “millennial” and “Gen Y” are the same thing.
  • Echo boomers: As children of Boomers, millennials make up the largest generation since their parents.
  • Digital natives: They are the first generation who don’t know life without the internet and personal tech devices.

By the way, my personal pet peeve surrounding the name is when it is couched in the phrase “so-called millennials.” We don’t say “so-called Gen X-ers,” do we? Can’t we just call them millennials at this point?

  1. What’s next?

The race is on, of course, to coin the term for the next generation, with contenders such as Post Generation, the iGeneration and the Pluralist Generation, also known as the “Plurals.” The name that’s used most often? Gen Z. And that’s leading some to speculate on the generation after that, many of whom haven’t even been born yet. Since we are now out of letters, one expert has stepped forward to call these yet-to-be-conceived kids Generation Alpha. (Personally, I am reserving judgment until that generation is actually conceived.)

In my opinion, being “millennial” is, in many ways, a state of mind. Pew Research even has a fun quiz, “How millennial are you?” that shows where you fit on the scale and how you compare with others in your generation.

And with that, class is dismissed. I’d love to hear what else you’ve always wanted to know about millennials and how you scored on the quiz in the comments!

Lindsey Pollak is the leading voice on millennials in the workplace, trusted by global companies, universities, and the world’s top media outlets — and, most importantly, by millennials themselves. A New York Times bestselling author, Lindsey began her career as a dorm RA in college and has been mentoring millennials — and explaining them to other generations — ever since. Her keynote speeches have audiences so engaged that, in the words of one attendee, “I didn’t check my phone once!” Contact Lindsey to discuss a speaking engagement for your organization.

95 Responses to “What Is a Millennial? Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask”

  1. Pam Scott

    Do you advise against using “Millennial” in marketing? If so, what term do we use instead? I have a new service that is directly geared to Millennials.

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Pam – Thanks for your question. What I advise is asking Millennials themselves what they would prefer to be called or what words they would most respond to in your marketing. My hunch is they won’t respond to “Millennial.” Good luck!

      – Lindsey

      Reply
      • lauren

        As someone who fits that demographic, i find it super weird when people refer to me as a millennial. It’s not offensive or anything, it’s just that usually the people who use that term don’t seem to even know anyone who would be considered millennial. Also typically the people who call us that are usually talking about how obsessed we are with technology…. so yah I wouldnt market with that if i were you.

        Reply
      • Courtney

        I have always considered myself as a millennial. Honestly it never occurred to me that people would be offended to be called one. I never let silly stereotypes get me down… I also would never consider myself or my siblings who are mostly millenials themselves, as lazy or entitled self absorbed idiots… I thank my father for that.. He had the foresight to use a little known concept called parenting and discipline to make us into the upstanding citizens we should be. I guess that males me part of the 40%

        Reply
    • Leia

      I see this is an old comment but just want to say I just learned from this article that I’m a Millennial. I assumed the word meant people born in the new Millenium, so today’s teenagers. I actually found this article because I finally Googled the term. Had no idea it was the same as Generation Y. That’s the term I’ve always associated myself with.

      Reply
      • Jeremy Guyer

        Welcome to the Millennial Generation, Leia! (lol) What sort of stereotypes did you feel Generation Y was associated with that differs from Millennials? (Simply curious.)

        Reply
    • Ryan Kahlie

      If you want to market an idea towards millennials, you should state it in a different way such as, “made for a new generation” or make it so it is easy to infer that it is for people in that age group by context clues. Don’t use the word millenials, it has a negative connotation.

      Reply
  2. Linda Hildebrant

    Great article here! I think one of the biggest negative attitudes towards this generation is that they are lazy. In truth, they’re innovative. It’s not that they are lazy, but that they will use available resources to do something in an hour that might take a Gen X’er two or three. In truth, many of the negative attitudes towards millennials might speak more about the generation holding them than it does about the actual Millennials.
    I think one of my favorite things about this generation is their tenacity. I saved this paragraph from a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article I read YEARS ago: “As a life-long teacher and school administrator, I can say with confidence that this generation of students is the best I’ve worked with in my 20-year career. It remains to be seen if their talent and optimism will allow them to guide our country towards a brighter future than what older Americans predict for them, but if the future for today’s youth is bleak, you wouldn’t know it by talking to them.”
    Side note—Love your blog!

    Reply
    • Thistle

      Most of the Gen Y folks I work with are lazy. They complain about having to do tasks. They dont care about wasting things/just throwing thins away because they aren’t the ones who have to pay for it. They have less respect for authority. Everything is about fun. The ones who do work hard, who take their job seriously are not the norm. They exist but they are few.

      Reply
      • Lindsey Pollak

        @Thistle – Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Do you think the “laziness” issue is a recruiting problem, a cultural issue or generational? I’d love to know what the hardworking Gen Ys think might help motivate the other group. – Lindsey

        Reply
        • Bo Chapman

          I work for a company that essentially only hires millenials and It has the harest working most fun culture in and company I have ever worked for. I work with quite a few millianares that are under thirty and their money alone shows they have intelligence and work ethic. the problem is one generation just wants to blame our problems on another. Look at how much millenials blame the previous generation for the current state of the economy. That’s a paradox that will probably never change.

          Reply
          • Emily

            The majority of the millennials have more money due to them still living at home. For the first time since 1880, ages 18 to 34 are more likely to live at home. This is up from 46 percent a decade ago. I’d be saving a lot of money too if I still lived at home. I find the millennials I work with to be very motivated, quick thinkers, and highly intelligent. I don’t find them to be lazy at all. I’m a baby boomer and I enjoy working with them. They bring life into our organization and without them everything would stand still. Their creative minds bring so much to the table. It’s sad to think that they are labeled lazy.

        • Paul

          I personally think that the laziness exhibited by millenials is a direct result of the over-consumptiveness of their parents, namely the baby boomer generation- those who continued to design a flawed world of the industrial age that relies on exploiting the earth’s natural resources for profit and proliferation of the society. While this may seem unrelated, I think the inner psyche of the baby boomer generation spoiled millenials, which explains for so much of my generation’s laziness and disregard for etiquette and constantly giving in to desire.

          Reply
          • satphat58

            Touch’e to that, always thought the pampering would result in lazyness, but I gotta say I give credence to the Iraqi era Soldier, they surprised me, after Iraqi Storm I was elaited to see how they stood the challenge.

        • Max Caliber

          I find for the most part that the perceived milenials don’t get their hands dirty. That doesn’t make them lazy…..they just find other work that avoids fiscal labor. I can’t put a percentage on it but it’s far more than my generation that would have considered such habits as lazy. Just sayin….

          Reply
          • Deb

            I found this page when I googled “millenial writing”, but I still can’t find the answers I’m looking for. Hoping one of you can help me out? I was recently asked to write content “with a millenial tone”, and I will admit ignorance! What is a millenial writing style? Have any tips?

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  7. Susan Wells

    If that is all they are than I feel sorry for them. I feel sorry for all of us who have been categorized. What a pity. That’s why I like being with dogs and dog owners. No one categorizes anyone. We just have fun.

    Reply
  8. clayton

    millenial is a broad generalization and the term gives me nausea. millenial is often used to describe a small group that of that population because they are more easily identified or standout more on social media or are so called hipsters. Only older people would use that term. What happened to the greasers,hippies, disco fever generation? They grew up. I’m sure older people looked down on all of them during their time. Every generation has it’s fads and moments that make older generations look down on them. Maybe we are old and forgot that period of time in our own lives as it becomes more distant. eventually every generation will move on to make room for another generation and “millenials” will have their turn to call the next lazy and make broad generalizations about.

    Reply
    • Caleb

      I completely agree–millennials are just the modern day’s term for young people.

      Older people like to separate themselves in a more positive way than younger people–it’s always been that way. Older adults in the 60’s were not calling Baby Boomers “hard workers” or suggesting that they were contributing much to society.

      Maybe there’s something about aging where we become jealous of the youth we see in some and we attack them for not living their lives or utilizing that youth in a way older people might with the existing foresight they now have.

      Reply
      • Jeremy Guyer

        I think you have some insight with your posting Caleb. I can only speak for myself as a near 30-year old. Even as a teen in high school I would look as the “establishment” (How things are) and wonder why everyone in the world was running around acting so crazy. People get entrenched in beliefs or taught through society “how things are” when in reality how things are was just put in place by some other person or groups of persons in the past, that probably had no more insight into why the heck they were here on earth than you, and everyone takes it as gospel. I think more than anything the “millennial” generation just has a fresh look at established society and says “this could be better”. And in the terms of laziness it would be “I’m not playing your insane game”

        Reply
  9. patrick willems

    Im by the age(29) a millenial but dont identify with most of it. I work for a moving company and work 70-80 hour weeks during the summer and work 40 hour weeks the rest of the year. Everyone I work with works very hard moving peoples heavy dressers and household goods. Im not a social media fan and work hard to play drums(2 hours a day). So not all millenials are lazy some of us bust our humps with no health care or vacation pay. Eveyone says these are :entitlements but i find that most who say this have these benefits. In europe everyone gets healthcare and vaction time. Im a type one diabetic and is very expensive to take care of. No one in this country should have to choose between thier life of paying rent.

    Reply
  10. Colin

    I fit into the category of a millenial, I was 19 in 2015. I have read a little bit on wikipedia about this term but still I can’t understand what it means. I had heard the term before but not in person only online in a video. From my understanding it is people aged 20-35 and that’s about it. In my opinion you can’t define a generation with characteristics because everyone is different. This actually backs up your point.

    Reply
  11. Sam

    I don’t totally agree with you, you see Ill be twenty-five next month, and I don’t classify myself as a millennial. I refer myself to being Gen. Y, because I always asked why am I doing this or that, not to be snotty or rude but to understand why and or how I am going to do it that is what I call Gen. Y, I classy Gen. Y as people born early to late 90’s, and when I was raised, I was raised to be respectful, hardworking and never had internet and didn’t untilI was 22, and I can still live without it. Now people born in the 2000’s, I consider them millennialist or the entitled generation, because most 2000’s born children gripe and complain if they don’t get a cell phone, or they don’t get passing grades they think they deserve, or they want people to do the work for them. So as I said before, I believe people born between 1990-1999 should be considered Gen. Y, and 2000-present should be Mellenialist or the Entilted Gen.

    Reply
  12. Kerry

    well said Sam! I couldn’t agree with you more!

    Reply
  13. Jefferson Hall

    Like a typical millennial…writing on and on about pointless issues while thinking that you’re making a positive contribution to the world by doing so.

    Dumb

    Reply
    • Jefferson Hall

      And again…like a typical millennial…you won’t be able to handle criticism so you’ll block the comment. I feel bad for this generation…weak, overly concerned and unable to hold a conversation without playing with their phone.

      Reply
      • Lindsey Pollak

        @Jefferson – Thanks for taking the time to comment. I am actually a Gen Xer myself, not a millennial. – Lindsey

        Reply
    • Gamergirl

      Overly concerned? Isn’t that describing yourself about this article? You’re trying to I shot it’s arthor with an I suit that is not even accurate. Don’t be a salty old man. And stop believing in sterotypes.

      Reply
  14. James Sterchele

    My son was born in 1990 and is a high school teacher, as well as three of his good friends that he graduated high school with. I listen to their opinions on the students they teach and they are of the opinion that only 1/3 of the students are interested in listening to them teach. The rest would rather take an online course and consider attending classes as a waste of time.

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @James – Thanks so much for the comment. So, your son and his friends are Millennials and the students would be Generation Zs. I wonder if in the future, most education will be some combination of in-person and online classwork. – Lindsey

      Reply
  15. Scott

    I disagree with being considered a millennial. I was born in 1987. According to the information I see here and elsewhere, millennials are 18-34. I did grow up without internet. I do remember life before cell phones and wifi. This age range is far too wide. I am not a part of this generation. I count the millennials as being those born in the 90’s. We are very different. With the rapid advancement of technology generations can no longer be so wide. Plain and simple, I’m not a millennial. I’m age 28 and those at age 34 have even less in common with that generation than I do.

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Scott – Thanks for taking time to share your thoughts. Needless to say, it is of course your choice how to view generational identity. I appreciate your input in the debate! – Lindsey

      Reply
    • Nick

      I agree Scott. I’m 34, born in 82. I can’t figure out for the life of me how i could have anything in common with someone who was born with an iPhone in their hand.

      I grew with up with no air conditioning in our home. No Internet, computers, cell phones. 13″ box tv with 5 channels and had to mess with the antenna for 30 minutes before finally sitting down to watch it. Hell my first car didn’t even have power steering or power anything for that matter. I’m disgusted to think that I’ve been put into a group with these kids. I have way more in common with people 10 years older than me. Actually people 10 years older than me can say all those same exact things i just listed.

      Reply
      • Taryn

        There are plenty of people your age, though, that absolutely fit into the description of a Millennial. My husband was born in 1982 and he is the most technology obsessed person who I have ever encountered. He is constantly attached to social media and some form of screen. On other other hand, I am 4 years younger and don’t even own a cell phone. Just like there were very different people growing up in the 60s and 70s, ranging from hippies to yuppies, there are different people in this generation as well. You don’t get to decide what a generation is based on your own perception of it. In actuality, the very fact that you are so insistent that you are a special snowflake who can’t be defined makes you the perfect example of this generation.

        Reply
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  17. Amanda S

    I have heard this term 3 times today and wanted to look it up. This was the first article in my search. Come to find out, I’m a person being considered a ‘Millennial’ at the age of 30. I considered myself a 90’s kid as I spent my school years in the 90’s, graduating in 2005. Millennials to me would be those who are 10 years my youth, who lived out their school years in the 2000’s. I’m a natural observer and noticed how much of a difference there is between 30 year olds and 20 year olds today. I think that’s the most dramatic age range of discovering yourself and those that are in their 20’s have different options than those of us who were 10 years advanced such as technology. We didn’t own a computer until my 5th grade year. This being said, I’m now in the technology field and intern with a local school district. Children are exposed to more information at their fingertips rather than having to actually go to a library or search through a book by page, thus altering the thinking method of how to obtain a ‘need’ in survival. Of course those who were born before my own time could very well say the same regarding my own generation.
    Environmental home life and new legislative laws have all changed within this time as well as technology. We’re making life a bit easier for ourselves which can be presumed as lazy to those who had to do the work. I suppose it’s all about how one perceives based on these qualities.
    Personally, I’m just over here trying to live with a family of our own while attending college full-time, trying to combine my passion of Photography into technology, and while making a living. Something a female couldn’t very well do decades before me but were faced with decisions of importance during that time in equivalence.
    Being called a Millennial isn’t a huge deal. Defining yet another label for a group of people is. Our generation is out to put an end to labels if you haven’t already noticed with fat shaming, sexual orientation, and race amongst the many others. We’re all just people living in a world that those before us created.
    So are we really to blame for our ‘label?’

    Reply
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  20. Sissy Falcon

    This article is pointless. The term “millennial” is used to describe a person born from the early 80s to 2000. There are bigger problems than “hurting” people’s feelings. Maybe we should be worrying about world hunger, or finding a cure for cancer.

    Reply
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  22. Isabel

    I’m 14, born in 2002, and I scored 98% Millennial. Reading through the comments, some Millennials, according to the article, do not consider themselves Millennials but 90’s kids. This leads me to think that maybe the term for “2000s kids” is Millenials. Just food for thought.

    Reply
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  26. Sarah

    How old are you? What makes an expert on an entire generation?

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Sarah – I am currently 41 and I have been studying young professionals (aka Millennials) for 14 years. I can’t say I’m an expert on everything about Millennials, but I try to learn and share as much as I can about this generation and their career/workplace success. Thanks, Lindsey

      Reply
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  28. Jasmine Opal Eacret

    It took me reading through the whole article and all the comments to realize what you(Lindsey) meant when you said most of the millennials would rather not have a title at all, but after reading all of the opinions of others in my generation (I was born in ’91) I see what you meant. I would rather not have a title and I do think it’s ridiculous to group everyone of a certain age group as lazy or even technologically dependent.
    I do think maybe we should drop the whole generation x boom y z millennial ect and just start using birth years? Everyone would be on the same page at least even though it’s still stereotyping.
    I can see why you study this, it’s very psychologically interesting without getting too personal.

    Reply
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  30. Tolu

    Wow, I scored 93! I used to think Millennial referred to those born any year after 1999. Didn’t know it referred to me too. I’m 26

    Reply
  31. Merianne Stoneback

    If “millenials” are supposed to include those who don’t know what it was like without the Internet (“digital natives”) then the term MUST be revised to EXCLUDE anyone born in the 80’s, or at least the early 90’s. As someone born in 1980, I got my first email address when I was 16, my first cell phone when I was a sophomore in college. We remember very well what it was like to grow up outside the digital age, with landlines and answering machines, and even pre-caller ID! Those of us born in the early 80s are actually part of the LAST generation who remembers what life was like WITHOUT digital access to everything, etc.

    Reply
    • Krista

      Lol. Just thought this comment was ended a little ignorant. Just because you were born in the early 80’s does not make you “the LAST generation who remembers what life was like WITHOUT digital access to everything”. I was born in 1992 and did not even have a cell phone or internet until I was 16 years old. Yes I had used a computer in elementary school because they wanted us to learn, but I grew up playing with Lite Brite, Etch-A-Sketch, a Slinky, a skipping rope, Barbies, crazy carpets in winter, rollerblades.. Shall I go on? I did not “depend” on technology what-so-ever until high school. So keep that in your brain next time you think you’re the last one who remembers life before it.

      Reply
  32. Louisa napier

    well im not very ‘millenial’ at all i scored 17, im aged 28. after seeing that the questions were mostly related to technology im not surprised by my score as im not a tech addict at all, i can take it or leave it. i can go days without even looking at my mobile phone im very much ‘old fashioned’ in that sense and crave the ‘simple’ days before the tech minded world we now live in where as a kid you played outside from morning til night, made dens in the woods and climbed trees. i might have grew up in the nineties but i didn’t grow up with technology, i don’t remember having computers at school or home until i was in my second last year of primary school (aged 11-12) and they were very basic no internet or anything. i must say i completely agree with absolutely everything the above commenter has said in that i also think that the term should be revised to exclude anyone born in the eighties and maybe early nineties. to me a millenial is someone born mid to late nineties onwards who doesn’t remember a time before technology, the internet etc. i do worry for my children growing up with the dangers of the internet and knowing the kind of things that are at kids fingertips these days. we were all taught about ‘stranger danger’ growing up but nowadays parents have the added worry of the unseen stranger the online predator aswell. oh how i wish my children were growing up in different times. i have found this article very interesting

    Reply
  33. Louisa napier

    just wanted to add, isn’t it interesting how other posters the same age as me scored high with 93 and above and i scored low, 17 just goes to show we don’t all necessarily fit the millenial ‘sterotype’

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Louisa – Yes, everyone is a unique individual and generational identity is just one factor in our personalities and preferences. – Lindsey

      Reply
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  35. Panic Boy

    These Millennials spend too much time thinking about themselves. I really don’t care to be giving them a participation trophy or a star for showing up to work on time. They are exhausting me. They are young people who need to contribute to society.

    Reply
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  39. Brenda

    Let’s consider,maybe,calling millennials as youngsters of this age!?:) Personally,i do not carry a negative connotation,for all intents and purposes,of these youngsters.i believe they just happen to be born in an era and in a climate where parents may be more liberal in their parenting style and may be much have more financial resources as well as being in a period of where high technology exist and for which they seem to have this ability to easily learn and use them,though not necessarily in the smartest of ways land which enable them to have less “physical” activity or motivation.Guess,there will always be the negatives and positives in every thing and everyone.perhaps,the only difference would be,what would matter to you most?by the way,i am Gen X born to parents of the world war2era, if ever that counts for something.Still,i guess,no matter the time you existed,it would be nice to strive to be an excellent human being?

    Reply
  40. John

    Love the irony here…as a millennial you desire for the rest of the world to accommodate you by not calling you millennials. Nice.

    Reply
  41. Millennials are mobile first – What Marketers need to know | Site Title

    […] you can probably call yourself a millennial. Demographers disagree, but it is widely accepted that those between the ages of 18-34 in 2015 can be identified as millennials. Other names applied to this generation […]

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  42. Millennials are mobile first- What marketers need to know? | Tessa O' Hanlon

    […] “the next great generation”, but after I did some further research I found that only 40% of millennials even identify with the term millennial. Apparently nearly 80% of those aged between […]

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  43. Millennials are mobile first- what marketers need to know | Site Title

    […] ”These Millennials or also known as Generation Y make up the largest generation since their parents, and are essentially ‘Digital natives’, meaning they are the first generation to not know life without the internet and personal tech devices” –Lindsey Pollak. […]

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  44. How to Deal With Stress Through Boxing – Unozerouno

    […] In any case, there is one characteristic that can be used to describe those people who are aged 18-34 as of 2015 [apparently they are the members of Gen Y, or millenials (if you […]

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  45. Jannette

    Why are people blaming the boomers on a millennial’s laziness? It does not matter the generation, you were raised from. It matters how you are raised as an individual. I am a boomer, my parents raised us on a farm/ranch. we had to work hard, the first four of seven children were raised this way, the last three were moved off this farm, the last three never had the same mind set of having to do chores every day to keep a farm going. They did not work as hard and are still not functioning on their own. Where the four oldest have homes , jobs and retirement saved for. The last three have drug issues are unable to support themselves, and have to rely on society and the state for income, all the result from the change in enviroment, peer groups, and rules and work ethic, and hence my parents, parenting skills also changed. I raised my children the same way, the first four of us were raised, to be responsible, work hard get an education. One is a physical therapist, and the other is in her second year of med school. Both are millennials. And very politically active. It is all about parenting skills not the mind set of a generation. My kids never had anything handed down to them, they had to earn their privileges. Get a job in their senior year in high school. Learn to build a savings account. They were taught that they would be going to college at a very young age, it was never if you decide to go, it was where are you going. It was not shoved down their throats it was just the mindset, taught as we have taught the all other crucial lessons in life. Taught that there is repercussions for poor decisions, and they are responsible for those decisions. And I know my grandchildren will be learning these same values.

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  46. Millennials are mobile first, What Marketers need to know. – Site Title

    […] the age of 22 looking to graduate, become independent and start to explore the world. According to Lindsey Pollak.com anyone between the age of 18-34 years old from 2015 is a millennial. Millennials got there name in […]

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  47. rENE

    I always find this age bracket interesting. I’m part of the “millennial” group. I was born in 1985 (31 years old). While I certainly have grown in adulthood with technology, social media, and techy gadgets, these devices certainly were not part of my “growing up”. Heck, my first computer was in Junior High school, and it was an old Apple computer that could only be used to play “lemonade stand” and the “Oregon trail”. The internet was not being used at that point (at least not in the area that I grew up in). Cell phones / text messaging didn’t become popular until I was in college. Facebook didn’t exist until I was in college. By that time–I had done most of my “growing”. I have grown up literally in both “generations”. Honestly, it matters not to me whether I am called a millennial or not. What is agitating is that people generalize that millennials are lazy, unsuccessful and disconnected. Truthfully, I have my “stuff” more together than many baby-boomers that I know. Furthermore, so do most of my “millennial” friends.

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  48. Lee

    Will the real Millennials please stand up! Supposedly, the term is reserved for people born between 1981 and 1997. However, if you listen to talk radio or media in general, it seems that the term is only applied to the absolute youngest of Millennials or even to young children. For example, the education director of the school where I work as a teacher seemed surprised to find out that I was in fact a Millennial and the kids we teach in the school are not old enough to be Millennials. For this reason, I am uncomfortable with the term in general. Besides, what massive similarities does a 30 year old have in common with an 18 year old? Both are Millennials, but age and life experience greatly shape an individual.

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  49. Anna

    I’m in the later wave of Gen Y – actually the tail end and I wouldn’t say we are digital natives that is reserved for Gen Z. All of Gen Y remembers a time before the internet and smart phones. I remember having to go to the library to do research in actual books. The problem here is that the latter half of Gen Y was raised in a time when technology was advancing rapidly in a very short period of time and we were young enough to learn along with it with roughly the same speed; but we still have memories of playing outside, being home by the time the street lights came on, playing unorganized sports, reading real paper books, etc. Since technology advanced so rapidly in a short period of time Gen Y is nostalgic for simpler times without technology ruling our lives. We grew up with the American dream being told that we could be anything if we worked hard enough – but then the housing bubble burst and we went into a recession. That American dream is now just a twinkle in our eye because we work hard and we’re under paid or not paid at all and can barely make rent for a tiny almost unlivable apartment. Gen Y is bitter because we were told to dream and work hard so we did but he have little to show for it.

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  50. Interview: Content & Millennials – Go Get Sara

    […] mine who is a senior in the Digital Cinema and Filmmaking program at Pace University. Tom is in the Millennial generation, and I chose to interview* him because of the importance and impact that Millennials have on the […]

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  51. 7 Harsh Realities Of Life Millennials Need To Understand – Awareness Act

    […] Millennial is a term used to typically describe those of the ages 18-34 in the year 2015. They are often referred to as the baby boom generation. One day millennials will run the world, and there are a few things that millennials have been raised to believe, that aren’t totally true. Here are 7 harsh realities of life that millennials need to come to terms with. […]

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  52. 7 Harsh Realities Of Life Millennials Need To Understand | RWC News

    […] Millennial is a term used to typically describe those of the ages 18-34 in the year 2015. They are often referred to as the baby boom generation. One day millennials will run the world, and there are a few things that millennials have been raised to believe, that aren’t totally true. Here are 7 harsh realities of life that millennials need to come to terms with. […]

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  53. Simple Steps To Improving Employee Engagement | Hppy

    […] in the workforce. You are bound to have heard that term by now, but if you still aren’t sure what constitutes a Millennial, it is anyone who was born between 1982 and 2004. Of course, this number is only going to rise as […]

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  54. Simple Steps To Improving Employee Engagement | BusinessBlogs Hub

    […] in the workforce. You are bound to have heard that term by now, but if you still aren’t sure what constitutes a millennial, it is anyone who was born between 1982 and 2004. Of course, this number is only going to rise as […]

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  55. Anonymous

    I was born in 2002 but I consider myself a 90’s kid at times. I mean most “Millenials” (2000-2004) are the people who beg and get phones before 5th grade. I just got my phone for Christmas and it’s not the smart phone. I don’t even need a smart phone to be honest I just like them because of Nes, Snes, N64, and GBA emulators. While most of the “Millenials” prefer the new Call of Duty and only play games because of the graphics. I only play the games by how much fun they are not by graphics. I always try my best in school and to respect my elders.

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  56. Jeff G

    Complete BS, all of it! How does anyone box an entire group of people into these small undefined and limited boxes? I do t understand myself how someone my age (39 years old, and barely what you’d consider a gen’ xer, born in 1978) could even remotely be grouped in with those groups of people who were born at the turn of the century. Everything about those seperate time periods were different. Those times (1978-1990) were a complete 180 from the technology, social norms, music, art, and culture of 2000. In my case, I didn’t even know what the internet even was until I was about 20 years old, and that was in 1998. I did t even own a computer until 2001, nor a cell phone until 2002. I had already served 5 years in the Army by this point, and some of you social engineering types are trying to say that I might possibly belong in the same cohort of youth as someone who had just been born during this time? Complete nonsense!

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  57. Clifford Doss

    Does anyone know what % of Millennials have children

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  58. Ahmed

    My apologies in advance for the below questions. 🙂

    Can I understand that Millenials are those born between between 1981 and 1997 ?
    Will they always remain ‘Millenial’?

    Reply
    • Lindsey Pollak

      @Ahmed – That is correct. According to Pew Research Center (although other organizations use a different year range), Millennials were born between 1981 – 1997. And yes, this name will be applied to the people born in those years for their entire lives, just as we’ve seen with the Baby Boomers. Thanks – Lindsey

      Reply
  59. Steve

    when i think of millennial, i do think of those who believe they are entitled. of course i can’t speak for all of them, but from the ones i have come across. the world is different now and it’s not their fault. they google something and believe it to be true. born in the 70’s, we had to research, go to a library, etc etc. we were more social and it was a better time. people view vacations through cell phones. while at home they text and surf what others are eating for dinner on facebook. it’s so disconnected. granted, people older are not. i’m a tech geek of 25 years and i rarely look at my phone. i love technology as a tool and not a crutch.

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